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The USA is the loudest nation on Earth. Its culture is presented to the rest of the planet in all forms of media, and has been for the decades that I've been parked in front of the TV. Kids in remote corners of the world grow up watching Sesame Street. I did, and as a result say "Zee" instead of "Zed", which pissed off my English teacher something fierce.
For those that take my jibes, barbs and sarcasm too seriously: I have no problem with that kind of cultural permeation. Far from it. I find it rather fascinating.
It has however led to a few "WTF?" moments. Questions as to what those crazy Yanks are talking about, as there is nothing comparable elsewhere. They're never in regards to anything major. Just little cultural quirks that have never escaped beyond the borders and, as such, are seen by outsiders as a total f**king mystery.

Things like "S'mores".

"S'more" is a word I've heard and read since the 80s.
"Let's make S'mores"
"Can we have S'mores?"
What the hell are you people talking about??!
I'd deduced that it was something to do with camping and, somehow, involved marshmallows. Was this what the Colonials called the practice of toasting marshmallows? How the hell did they arrive at that as a phrase? It never dawned on me as to what a "S'more" really was as no one, in any part of the world I have travelled, has ever sat by a campfire, looked at the marshmallow they're toasting and thought "Y'know what this needs? More sugar."
The blessed saviour of the ignorant, Wikipedia, has finally scratched that trans-century itch. I now know what a S'more is, and can go back to eating my deep-fried Mars bar in peace.
  • Listening to: Booming orchestral scores
  • Reading: a book
  • Watching: Craptacular anime
  • Playing: Minecraft
  • Eating: Bread
  • Drinking: Water
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:iconrustyironmonger:
rustyironmonger Featured By Owner Jan 25, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
You haven't heard of/tried balut, durian, mock duck, surströmming, rakfisk, hákarl or kiviak.
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:icontaharka:
Taharka Featured By Owner Jul 14, 2013
You should try a s'most.

Take the typical S'more recipe (toasted marshmallow, chocolate, Graham Crackers) and replace the Graham Crackers with Apple Cinnamon Pop-tarts (or whatever the closest equivalent is in fair blighty).

S'most you can eat is one!
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:iconshawnleroy:
ShawnLeroy Featured By Owner Jun 14, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Ah, s'mores... I once had to explain what s'mores were to a Brit. Thank God for Wikipedia, or I wouldn't even know how to describe them appropriately.

I think the word originated from a lazy bastardization of the two words "Some" and "More". Two cowboys slurred those together one night while drunk by the camp fire and toasting marshmallows. One decided that he'd make a sandwich with the marshmallows and what he had at hand, which happened to be Graham Crackers (had to explain what these were, too - they are crackers made from wheat and honey, essentially) and chocolate. What they discovered was culinary GENIUS.

"Say, Jed. Can I have S'more?"
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:iconjmiera:
JMiera Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2013  Professional Filmographer
mmm S'mores :heart:
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:iconramoranscout:
RamoranScout Featured By Owner May 27, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
Yeah, I myself can only handle one or two S'mores before the sugar overwhelms me and I explode. They're really tasty though.
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:iconneko-kitty-ninja:
Neko-Kitty-Ninja Featured By Owner May 26, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I'm American and I always thought they were associated with winter, but I figured out this year that they're more of a summers treat

And the name I'm 99% sure came from "Yes I'd like some more" and later s'more was just the mesh of the last two words

I just use my gas stove in California, light the marshmallow on fire, let it burn for a bit before blowing it out and smoothing it while its still red hot so that it partially melts the chocolate

Mouth watering if I do say so myself, with a big glass of milk :3
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:iconmisterichart:
Misterichart Featured By Owner May 26, 2013  Hobbyist
Why, one of us most likely said.. Billy Joe, what are these?" I don't know But they sure Are good, Give me Smore" and the rest is As they say History.... love your Journals!!! ...
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:icongeekhyena:
Geekhyena Featured By Owner May 21, 2013
I've always preferred taking a toasted marshmallow, sliding the chocolate inside it, and then shoving the whole hot gooey mess into my mouth. Or just eating the melty marshmallow itself.
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:icon6-qubed:
6-Qubed Featured By Owner May 20, 2013
They have entire displays dedicated to s'mores at Walmart. I've never understood the fascination, myself. Mainly because it involves graham crackers, which I never liked because my especially cheap preschool only ever bought graham crackers for snacks.

And then later I found out that the guy who made them thought he could make people stop fucking so much by eating the stupid things, and thus I rejected them on moral grounds.
Reply
:iconthegreathibiki:
TheGreatHibiki Featured By Owner May 20, 2013
Never cared for S'mores.

Gimmie some nice Cadbury cream eggs and we're prime. Have loved those since a child I was.
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:iconstridersyd:
StriderSyd Featured By Owner May 19, 2013
Isn't Oliver Twist famous for asking for "S'more?"
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:iconmauser712:
Mauser712 Featured By Owner May 19, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
One should note that the British Mars Bar and the American Mars bar are different. The American variant has whole almonds in it.
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:iconjollyjack:
jollyjack Featured By Owner May 19, 2013
Madness.
Reply
:iconstreaked-silver:
Streaked-Silver Featured By Owner May 20, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
well the United States of America is the country that came up with a new measuring system (that we still only use) and called it 'Standard' something tells me that the U.S. also got some of Japans 'WhatTheFuck-ery' when we where made.
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:iconjusticex:
Justicex Featured By Owner May 19, 2013
Smores is some chocolate and marshmallow inbetween two cookies (like a sandwich) and cooked over a campfire. Very delicious.

As for asking for s'more, it's slang created by people too lazy to to talk properly.
Reply
:iconzoonrobot:
zoonrobot Featured By Owner May 16, 2013
I don't know if this was already said but i was taught we call them "S'mores" because when you've got a mouth full while chewing you all ways ask for "some more" or "S'mores". not that that clears any of this amazing mystery up.
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:iconsincityorkarts:
SinCityOrkArts Featured By Owner May 16, 2013
Deep fried Mars bar sounds yummy. Please ship these elusive Mars bar to the US.
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:iconrivisindigoemporium:
RivisIndigoEmporium Featured By Owner May 16, 2013  Professional General Artist
Had my first s'more of the season just last weekend, in fact... ;P
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:iconaltearithe:
altearithe Featured By Owner May 16, 2013  Professional Artisan Crafter
I now have a craving for some s'mores...though I never really managed to make them right...or something. They were always difficult for me to eat. >.<
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:iconrookie2:
rookie2 Featured By Owner May 16, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
As someone who was born in South Carolina, I must say that, in keeping with the title, the American food is rather bland, as in tasting pretty much the same. A cheeseburger for example tastes the same almost everywhere they serve one. I personally prefer international food over american
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:iconjaketheultimate:
jaketheultimate Featured By Owner May 16, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
I often wish it worked in all directions so I could be more frequently as confused as I was the first time I saw ramen that was more than just noodles. (I was 14 and stereotypical. Hush.)
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:icondamienmaxwell23:
DamienMaxwell23 Featured By Owner May 16, 2013
As a born and raised US citizen I find this absolutely and totally fucking hilarious XD It's always interesting to see what people in other parts of the world think of these little bits of our culture as it goes out to the world, and even more what holes appear as a result.
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:iconlittlelifeforms:
LittleLifeForms Featured By Owner May 16, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Hilariously, the uber-agent "Z" in MIB is pronounced "ZED"... at least in the animated series.

:kitty:
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:iconi-am-devan:
I-Am-DeVan Featured By Owner May 16, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
I have to admit. This had me in stitches.
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:iconcoreddesigns:
CoredDesigns Featured By Owner May 16, 2013  Professional Artist
The name comes from the fact that once you have had one you want S'more or some more.
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:iconjrhogg:
JRHogg Featured By Owner May 16, 2013
Kinda funny how Google and Wikipedia have killed the "What is the DEAL with X" joke.
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:iconmhirtes:
mhirtes Featured By Owner May 16, 2013
And I would just like to point out that the US term "fish sticks" is more proper than the UK term "fish fingers" for the simple fact that it makes the joke by Jimmy & Cartman work. :)
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:iconpeekajinx:
Peekajinx Featured By Owner May 16, 2013
S'mores are delicious.. You toast the marshmellow on a campfire then smush it between 2 graham crackers and a piece of chocolate
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:iconterraclaws:
TerraClaws Featured By Owner May 16, 2013
I couldn't agree with you more.
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:icongothforhappypeople:
GothForHappyPeople Featured By Owner May 16, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
I say zee in the alphabet song, but zed if should I be spelling anything with a zed.

I've had deep fried pizza, but didn't have the courage to try a deep fried mars bar. My dad once made me a mars bar cheesecake.
That was sick-tastic.
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:iconerelonhart:
ErelonHart Featured By Owner May 16, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
I am, frankly, amazed at the number of people that have commented about how to make a s'more, and how they think the name was created, even though you stated in the journal that you've already satisfied your curiosity.

(I also find it a bit sad that so many Americans, aka members of the junkfood nation, don't know how to spell "Hershey" :facepalm: )
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:iconformorian5:
formorian5 Featured By Owner May 16, 2013
So in Britain, Z is called Zed instead of Zee? I wondered why that guy in Men in black had a multi letter name. He didn't.
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:iconshadowelven:
shadowelven Featured By Owner May 16, 2013  Hobbyist Photographer
YOU'RE KILLIN ME SMALLS [link]
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:iconcircus:
circus Featured By Owner May 16, 2013
Add me to the list of brits that said Zee instead of Zed thanks to sesame street, had to train myself out of that..
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:iconmarshall123x:
Marshall123x Featured By Owner May 16, 2013
Well, i believe "S'mores" got their name due to the fact that they are sweet and delicious. Two factors that drive kids and adults mad alike. Example : Man that was sooooo good, can i have s'more? People were so excited about how it tasted, they didn't want to waste time with proper English. but honestly i dunno why they have that name, nor do i even enjoy s'mores. matter of fact i dont like them at all, too much sugar.
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:iconjimss:
jimss Featured By Owner May 15, 2013
im American and i'll give you guys the rights to S'mores in exchang for MORE DEEP FRIED MARS BARS. my dad who is old as dirt since im 43 saids the term S'mores comes from his child hood and its short for "some more" i don't know if thats true but it sounds like something kids here would do since we invent slang terms for every thing lol good luck with you're mars bars
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:iconnocturnalkitten-art:
NocturnalKitten-Art Featured By Owner May 15, 2013
I learned to say Zee too (but I'm not sure how, maybe Sesame Street too?).

But I honestly prefer it.
It fits with the rest of the alphabet better by keeping to the sound patterns (and feels a lot less like hitting a brick wall at the end of the Alphabet too, lol).

S'mores are actually rather good too~ Dunno where the name came from though. :shrug:
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:iconmidmorningdigger:
MidmorningDigger Featured By Owner May 15, 2013  Student Digital Artist
Good GOD MAN! Had we known that this wonderful treat was unknown to the rest of the globe we would have elaborated. Since we all grew up with s'mores, we took it for granted.

Hmmm... fried Mars bar...
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:iconjackjumperd3:
jackjumperD3 Featured By Owner May 15, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
S'mores are fucking gross. Well, to me at least. I hate marshmallows.
Reply
:iconrosevictoria:
RoseVictoria Featured By Owner May 15, 2013
Haha! I am fascinated by the thought of others having issued with the way Americans talk. I've never truly been able to think about the world the other way around since I grew up here. Please tell me other things that confuse you about the American language! We Americans are funny people <3
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:iconmyrksuki:
MyrkSuki Featured By Owner May 15, 2013
Hey, marshmallows are pretty good toasted, but still kinda bland. Chocolate is nice, but not fun to hold melted. So that's why you have a couple of graham crackers to keep everything in place.
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:icongammarallyson:
gammarallyson Featured By Owner May 15, 2013
Dem's fighting words!
Reply
:iconskyrere:
skyrere Featured By Owner May 15, 2013
hahahahahahhaa...
It's always ok to ask. We don't bite...
Much. XD
Reply
:iconnecrophear:
Necrophear Featured By Owner May 15, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
"S'more" as a name was created as a name for a Girl Scouts treat, back in the 30s or 40s, according to my mum; she doesn't shut up about it.
Reply
:icondinshino:
dinshino Featured By Owner May 15, 2013
Ja, I've been trying to figure out why we call them "s'mores" myself since I was eight. The closest thing I've come up with is that some little kid who could barely talk was trying to ask for "some more", but the little tyke couldn't say it right and it came out "s'more". I assume that this happened at the first campfire this combination was tried at and their parent(s)/guardian(s) found it endearing and it some how caught on.

If you want to try something exotic from the USA, here's a list of suggestions:
Pretty much anything from the list marked "Dishes" here especially any tiswin and frybread
Buffalo meat (you cook it just like beef but it tastes better)
Sarsaparilla- Said "sas-puh-ril-uh". It's the precursor to root beer.
Sarsaparilla Tea- It's tea derived from the same plant the soft drink is. Good luck finding this outside of a reservation.
Birch beer- A carbonated soft drink made from herbal extracts, usually from birch bark It has a minty taste to it.
Alligator meat is also pretty good. It tastes a bit like chicken mixed with fish. Ranch raised tend to taste almost exactly like chicken.
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:iconirishfan62:
irishfan62 Featured By Owner May 15, 2013
Try it, s'mores are really good. And while I'd be open to trying deep-fried Mars bars, I don't even know where I can get a regular one, let alone a deep fried one (probably at a state fair or something...)
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:iconcrazyweezil:
CrazyWeezil Featured By Owner May 15, 2013
Ah, the s'more. What a ridiculous way to destroy a perfectly good chocolate bar.

And speaking of things you don't understand, what is vegemite? I hear it used, but don't know what it is.
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:iconjollyjack:
jollyjack Featured By Owner May 15, 2013
It's a spread made from yeast extract.
It's Australian.
It's British counterpart is Marmite.
Both taste like arse.
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:iconcrazyweezil:
CrazyWeezil Featured By Owner May 16, 2013
Well, that sounds . . . rather unappetizing. Thanks for the info.
Reply
:iconwhispatchet:
Whispatchet Featured By Owner May 16, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Aww come on, Vegemite doesn't taste that bad. It's especially good with cheese. :)
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