Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
An odd statement for a quasi-neo-imperialist to say, I know, but if the Colonials hadn't (justifiably) got shirty over lack of representation in Parliament, the British Empire would never have become the behemoth that it did.
Thanks to the rebellion/revolution, the British Government changed the way it conducted itself so as to ensure such an incident would never happen again.
Had they not, a revolution similar to that seen in France, 1789, would have very likely occurred on home turf.
The French leadership maintained their "all powerful" façade, and in assisting the American colonies, spent a fortune. This further angered their already irate people, who, in seeing that it could be done, decided to have a little revolution of their own.
So, with the economy booming thanks to renewed transatlantic trade between Fair Blighty and the newly formed United States and with Britain's arch enemy France focused on tearing itself apart, there was nothing to stop the Empire's expansion.

By 1922, it consisted of 458 million people across 13 million square miles.

22% of the Earth's habitable surface.

Thanks, Yanks!

:D
  • Listening to: Booming orchestral scores
  • Reading: Emiroth
  • Watching: Now You See Me
  • Playing: Not much. I'm busy.
  • Eating: food
  • Drinking: water
Add a Comment:
 
:iconthegoodsamaritan:
thegoodsamaritan Featured By Owner May 28, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
You're welcome! :D
Reply
:iconbadmillennial:
BadMillennial Featured By Owner May 22, 2014
Napoléon was the real founder of the Second British Empire, since he squandered the resources of your main imperial rival by endless campaigns in Europe which did Britain little harm even when successful, while leaving the Royal Navy free to wander the world picking up whatever bits struck London's fancy. If that wasn't enough, he also ruined our lesser rivals like Spain and Holland. If Brits had any gratitude, he would occupy the fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square.
Reply
:iconmalinborn:
malinborn Featured By Owner Jul 29, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
a very belated.. you're welcome
Reply
:iconsloppyjoe7:
SloppyJoe7 Featured By Owner Jul 19, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
Umm... Your welcome?
Reply
:icontalinuva:
talinuva Featured By Owner Jul 17, 2013
And the sun still hasn't set.
Reply
:iconrennistora:
RennisTora Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Meh, I'm Canadian.
Reply
:iconshawnleroy:
ShawnLeroy Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2013  Professional Digital Artist
Haha! A very enlightened look at History, my good fellow.
I agree. Some people say America is still "technically" a British colony. Best way to rule is from the shadows. Best slaves are those who think they are free. ;)
Reply
:iconshinsengumi77:
shinsengumi77 Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Oh God Dammit! :nuu:
Reply
:iconmarshall123x:
Marshall123x Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2013
nice history lesson yo.
Reply
:icondarkecofreak23:
darkecofreak23 Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2013  Student Writer
You're welcome, you tosh pot. lol ;)
Reply
:iconderrflinger:
Derrflinger Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2013
In my opinion the whole thing not only strengthened Britain's empire but also somewhat raised the English view of the Americans. Not only did that weird "special relationship" start almost immediately with the proto conservatives immediately preferring Britain over France, the Brits tended to grant a rather lot of leeway to the nascent Yankee state. While the redcoats did fight the continentals again in 1812, overall the UK seemed to treat their offspring-nation with more respect than their more loyal nations. Most territorial disputes of the Nineteenth and early Twentieth centuries between the USA and Canada often ended with the Brits supporting the USA's side, such as with the Alaskan dispute of 1903. The only time the USA firmly backed away from land grabbing was when it eventually decided "you know what, maybe we don't need the ENTIRE west coast of North America, and any way we'ze invadin Mexicans at the moment" aka 1846-1848
Reply
:iconferaldrive:
FeralDrive Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
If only the UK actually meant something to the rest of the world today like say, Germany ... oh well.
Reply
:iconckentavr:
CKentavr Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2013
Of course, if it didn't happen, England may not have abolished slavery, either. Not that they did that in practice.
Reply
:iconsniper-bait:
Sniper-Bait Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2013  Student Digital Artist
As one of those Yanks, I'm here to say, "You're welcome!"

Happy 4th of July! I know it's not independence day for you, but I can still wish you a good day, right?

Oh wait...the 4th was yesterday...
Dammit.
Reply
:icondigoraccoon:
Digoraccoon Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Uh... you're welcome? :D
Reply
:iconvlrgll:
VlRGlL Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2013
Don't care. I got freedom.
Reply
:iconredwingsdragon:
RedWingsDragon Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2013
W00T for rebellion!
Reply
:iconxlrp:
XLRP Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2013
proof that slaughtering nobles/government representatives is a option that should always remain on the table. :D
Reply
:iconford-w-maverick:
Ford-W-Maverick Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013
Ahh, Independence Day, or as I like to call it "Proof that Sometimes Violence IS the Answer Day!"
Reply
:icontarukai:
Tarukai Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013
Anytime, friend! (or frenemy?)
Reply
:iconmaciapaladin:
MaciaPaladin Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013
I like how you slipped in that "tiny" jab about foreign wars decimating the French economy, because Lord knows, as an American, I have NO idea who could sound like that today. ;p
Reply
:iconjollyjack:
jollyjack Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013
Wasn't intended as a jab. It's what happened.
History repeats itself, I guess.
Reply
:iconbleu-ace:
Bleu-Ace Featured By Owner Jul 21, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Quite right. Look at Napoleon. He invaded Russia during the winter.

Hilter then repeats this mistake in WWII.
Reply
:icontheedarkcorner:
Theedarkcorner Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
History DEFINITELY repeats itself. Over and over and over and over and over....
Reply
:iconmaciapaladin:
MaciaPaladin Featured By Owner Jul 5, 2013
Let's say I was less offended and more amused by the parallel. ;)
Reply
:iconmythicalcomics:
MythicalComics Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013  Student General Artist
You know, I was going to cite India's independence in 1947, British decolonization of Africa and other territories from 1950 to 1981, and how by 1997 the British Empire was all but history, but then an ad superimposed on my comment and made me start over. So I'll just say, "Well, you Limeys do like to aggrandize things a tad, don'tcha?"
Reply
:icontherealyuma:
TheRealYuma Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
There was crap on both sides. Given that neither side could really communicate properly, it was bound to happen sooner or later. And does "quasi-neo-imperialist" really mean anything?
Reply
:iconmaliceintheabyss:
MaliceInTheAbyss Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
'MERICA!
Reply
:iconsamblob:
SamBlob Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013
Well, there's that, and there's the collapse of the Mogul Empire and the British filling the power vacuum and turning Victoria into the Empress of India.

Funny thing is, Britain's last major land grab happened as a result of the catastrophe that destroyed Britain's will to power: the First World War. It was so terrible that the British would do anything, up to and including the betrayal of Czechoslovakia at Munich, to stop something like that from happening again.
Reply
:iconphilbrush:
Philbrush Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013
England has had it's share of happy accidents!

Had Australia never been settled, then I wouldn't be living in such a fantastic country! And although I am pretty sure I am not descended from the original colonists (mostly being convicts), the country wouldn't have shaped itself quite how it did (although we as a people have made our share of mistakes)!
Reply
:iconsean188:
Sean188 Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
'Rebellion'? it was more of a Civil War cause by the time war was declared they hadn't stated their independence it was more Brit-on-Brit action but i didn't fully understand why the french had a little Revolution party of their own until now so thnx dude
Reply
:iconarkone:
Arkone Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013
This post was quite interesting, though I must disagree in a number of points. In particular, the British didn't "change the way it conducted itself," unless you count becoming steadily more... um...evil, really. The British Navy, the military superpower of the 19th century ,was based on conscript slaves and child soldiers and brutal treatment of the aforementioned slave sailors; the repeated press ganging of American sailors (serving on American vessels before being hailed by British captains at sea needing some replacement crew) was a huge factor in the events leading up to the War of 1812 (or as I call it, "the War of Stupidity." Every way involves a lot of stupidity, but the War of 1812 was especially ridiculous).

At the same time, British expansion continued under increasingly brazen and totalitarian strategems. The infamous "Boer Wars" began when Dutch settlers in Africa found diamonds and the British Empire said "we want that... so we'll take it." The Chinese culture still retains emotional scars from the Opium Wars (when the British invaded to force the Chinese to allow the continued drug trade, so the British could ensure an unrestricted supply of Chinese tea and other goods). India... it was the British that Ghandi was fighting against, when he used nonviolent resistance against imperialist oppressors. And that's not even touching on the horrible, horrible things that were done to the Irish.

The British did wise up in their treatment of America after the War of 1812, however; the cultivation of friendships resulted in American assistance during WWI and WWII, and that friendly relationship persists to this day. But to say that the success of the American Revolution was an achievement for the Empire sounds rather like claiming that losing a trophy in a sporting match means excellent news for an overcluttered living room.
Reply
:iconmichiganotaku:
MichiganOtaku Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013
You're welcome, JollyJack. And in response, thank YOU. Great Britain for giving us the Industrial Revolution.
Reply
:icongatonegroloco:
GatoNegroLoco Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013
no prob homie. just do something bout Rupert Murdoch while hes over there and we'll call it even.
Reply
:iconjollyjack:
jollyjack Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013
He's too rich. He'll slither out of the inquiries currently levelled at News Corp.
Don't worry too much, though. The satirists are hard at work destroying his eternal reputation.
Reply
:iconcsbernard:
CSBernard Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013
Indeed. As demonstrated by the Canadian Rebellions of 1837. And to think, Canada was supposed to be the more well-behaved child in the household.

[link]
Reply
:iconbigloader69:
BigLoader69 Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013
HeHe Not a problem glad we could help you Brits out. You know after reading this a second time you kinda suggest that England would have gotten no where if we Americans hadn't decided to revolt. Which is very funny.
Reply
:iconprdarkfox:
prdarkfox Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Hey, thanks for the history lesson! ^^
Reply
:iconconnorcat:
ConnorCat Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013
That's actually a pretty interesting point of view XD
Reply
:iconexplositionrooster5:
ExplositionRooster5 Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Yeah well we still saved your ass in WW2!

Suck it, Limey!
Reply
:iconsamblob:
SamBlob Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013
I'm missing something here... Hitler's forces were stopped at the English Channel, El Alamein, and Stalingrad. How many American troops were at any of those places when it happened?
Reply
:iconprdarkfox:
prdarkfox Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Don't ever make that kind of comment again.
Reply
:iconrabbitmaskedman:
rabbitmaskedman Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013  Student Digital Artist
Dude, really? Someone says something you don't like and you start telling them what they can and can't say.

Not cool.
Reply
:iconscyth118:
scyth118 Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013  Professional Interface Designer
JJ is a really sarcastic person as you can see by... well ALL of his journals and a lot of his art.

Don't freak out and take the high road when someone fires back. I doubt he was really trying to prove a point anyway.
Reply
:iconprdarkfox:
prdarkfox Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I'm sorry, my sarcasm radar is a bit broken.
Reply
:iconscyth118:
scyth118 Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013  Professional Interface Designer
It happens to everyone.
Reply
:iconturkish182:
Turkish182 Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013  Student Photographer
Well, it's true.

Unless blackout curtains were a fashion statement and the blitzkrieg was just an urban renewal project that was misunderstood...
Reply
:iconprdarkfox:
prdarkfox Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I'm just under the impression that everyone had a hand in everyone's relative success. We weren't called the "Allies" for nothing. It's just that American history tends to be written a bit too far in their own favor.
Reply
:iconturkish182:
Turkish182 Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013  Student Photographer
Everyone's history tends be written in their own favor.

But in this particular case it's true.
Reply
:iconzacharyzemsen:
ZacharyZemsen Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Learning history might be boring in classes, but things like this are actually quite interesting.
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×

:iconjollyjack: More from jollyjack


Featured in Collections

Journal by makoshark04


More from DeviantArt



Details

Submitted on
July 4, 2013
Link
Thumb

Stats

Views
8,133
Favourites
46 (who?)
Comments
334
×